Time to Stop Planning and Start Doing

cre_150602_02582_3_4_es-1A couple dozen times a year for over a decade I have driven passed this elm tree, and the farmer’s field in which it’s stood for several decades.  I have driven by during different seasons, with different sunrises and sunsets in the background, different crops growing in the field, different weather conditions, e.g., rain, snow, drought, different times of the day, in different moods, and for different reasons.  Visions of a hundred different images have popped-up in my head, but I never stopped to capture any of them on film or sensor.  This time was no different.  I didn’t stop in passing.  No, on this particular morning, this was my destination, and perhaps my destiny.

Before retiring to bed the night before this was taken, I spoke to myself and said, “If you wake up on your own, not alarm clock assisted, anytime between 4:00 AM and 4:30 AM, you are going to get out of bed and drive to this elm tree in the hope of capturing an image worth the trouble”.  When I finally crawled into bed, my camera gear was loaded and ready to go.  What I was going to wear was already laid out.  The coffee maker was filled with coffee makings and waiting only to have the start button pushed at whatever time I should walk into the kitchen.  Yep, you can guess what happened; Yes, it really did!

Sixty minutes, three gallons gasoline, and $6.50 in tolls later, I found myself pulling off the turnpike, driving across the right-of-way, and parking alongside the fence separating the farmer’s private land from the public’s “hurry up and get their toll road.  Yes, I finally did it!  I’m glad I did it!

What…are you…waiting on?  Hmm?  Stop planning and go do it!  You’ll be glad you did.

Best of the Day

Waylen Knapp - Photographer
Sunset at Sandy Sanders’ WMA

Recently a friend and I traveled to the Sandy Sanders’ Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in far western Oklahoma on a photo safari.  It was following an unusually wet spring, following several years of exceptional drought.  Besides being a fun outing to see how the water had risen in lakes and streams along the way, we were hoping for an explosion of wildflowers in bloom throughout the WMA.  We also had the goal of staying late at Sandy Sanders’ and photographing the sunset.

As it turned out, it wasn’t a successful trip for fine art photography but it was hugely successful for a lot of fun and fellowship.  Fine art photographers are by nature, and choice, loners, so when I can spend the day with a good friend and fellow photographer, it’s a day worth remembering.

We had a lot of fun in my FJ Cruiser driving through mud and water and over washed out roads throughout the deserted Sandy Sanders’ WMA and I learned some important things about using 4-wheel drive.  These lessons may come in handy in the future; at least I’m hoping they do.  We were the only sign of humanity all day long and the first to drive over some of the rough and rugged dirt roads since the last rain.  We had a great time exploring and searching for opportunities that didn’t seem to be forthcoming and by sundown we had to choose the best of the worst.  We never found what we were looking for, and that sometimes happens.  The photo I took of my friend, above, is perhaps the best the picture I took all day.  I know it will be the one I cherish and remember.