Patience: Not Easy

Patience Pays Off
Daylight Spills Across the Refuge

Patience:  Not So Much

In my youth, personal projects were marred because I lacked patience to wait for the first coat of varnish to dry completely before I applied a second coat.  I stopped fishing years ago.  I just couldn’t sit and wait patiently for a bite.  Unless I must, I don’t stand in lines.  I switch lines during checkout only to watch the one I vacated move faster than the one in which, impatiently, I now wait.  Grilling with charcoal takes patience to wait for the coals to get just right.  Now, I grill with propane.  It’s a good thing I like my steak medium rare.  I’m just sayin’.

My lack of patience extends to my photography.  I hunt for scenes that are materializing at the moment.  If it doesn’t, I’m off and running, again.  I’m kinda like a storm chaser only I chase images.  Lighting conditions change so quickly, countless times I have packed away my gear and driven off only to see the picture coming together in my rear view mirror.  Ansel Adams once said, “Sometimes I do get to places just when God’s ready to have somebody click the shutter.”  Aha, that’s what I’m after.  Every time.  The reality is that it rarely ever happens.  Adams was better known for arriving at a destination, setting up his tripod and camera, composing a shot, focusing, setting the camera and then sometimes, waiting for hours for the light he envisioned.  That’s patience I don’t have, but I’m working on it.  Age and retirement are making it easier, somewhat.  I offer the picture above as an example of improved patience.

Before going to bed the night before, I made a commitment to go to the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge for a sunrise picture.  That meant leaving for the Refuge at dark-thirty.  Even as I was pulling out of my driveway, I had thoughts about calling it off; In the darkness I could tell the sky was heavily overcast and I thought to myself, “What’s the use?  The sunrise won’t be visible, anyway.  I didn’t get a lot of sleep last night.  There are things I could be doing at home.”  Reasons not to go.  Then, the thought about Ansel propelled me out of the driveway, down the street and on my way.

Being familiar with an area helps.  Upon entering the Refuge via the Cache gate, I drove to an area of promise should light begin to break through the clouds and before the light became too harsh.  With civil twilight barely creating enough light to avoid tripping over a cobblestone protruding from the ground (I rarely use a flashlight), I made my way, backpack filled with equipment, tripod in hand, to a position of best potential. Once there, I set up my tripod and camera, composed the scene, set the camera and focus to achieve the greatest depth of field and began to wait.  My impatience, clicked the shutter a few times in spite of not seeing anything worthwhile.  It wasn’t long before I spied a spot with better potential.  I moved and set up again.  I took a few more pictures as light began to break through the clouds.  After a few minutes, I spied a third spot even better.  I moved again and set up, again.  Things were beginning to work out.  The light was breaking through, highlighting some interesting points of interest.  I was happy and having fun.  Until I noticed a fourth spot, even better than the first three.  This perch required some boulder hopping, precarious foot placement, and some pretty nifty balancing to get all set up for the image you see above.  I must tell you, the best light, at each of the other places, came after I had moved.  This, I determined would be my last move; I was going to exercise patience and stay there until the good light had ended.  And I did!  Yea!  This isn’t a spectacular image.  It has some good points and some that could be better.  However, this was more about developing my patience than anything else.  In that regard I made some progress, but, I still have a good ways to go.

Carl